• When someone says cut to the chase, it means to talk about or focus on what’s important.

  • To skip to the heart of the matter; getting to the point, leaving out all of the unnecessary details.

  • To say what is important without delay.

1. A: Hi, what’s up?

B:I’m just gonna to cut to the chase, my car fell into a ditch. Can you come and help me?

 

2. A: You said you had something to tell me?

B: Carmen, your mother and I love you very much. Let me cut to the chase, we’re getting a divorce.

 

3. I have bad news for you so let me cut to the chase. You’re fired.

 

4. A: Just cut to the chase. What’s going on?

B: I’m in some trouble and I need money.

address the issue, be brief, be frank, cut a long story short, cut the matter short, get on with it, get to the particulars, get to the point, make a long story short, speak plainly

Related Posts

  • In a heartbeatIn a heartbeat
  • Two-faced Use our Phrase of the Day to upgrade your language skills or check out our blog. We have […]
  • Easy on the eyesEasy on the eyes Use our Phrase of the Day to upgrade your language skills or check out our blog. We have […]
  • Cut it outCut it out Idioms, examples and more. Come on in, we're ready to help you learn!
  • To have a big mouthTo have a big mouth Use our Phrase of the Day to upgrade your language skills or check out our blog. We have […]
  • Easier said than doneEasier said than done Idioms, examples and more. Come on in, we're ready to help you learn!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This